Christian Rogler

Christian Rogler, born 1973 in West-Germany, is a single father and self-employed communication service provider.

Source: Still AB / shutterstock.com Well channeled: When dad is close to son

School killing spree in Florida:
Sanctimonious gun debate is a distraction

Much more relevant factors are fatherlessness and the destruction of the family

Of all the low points of the political-media complex in the last few days, the handling of the latest school rampage in Parkland, Florida, was one of the most blatant, but also predictable.

As if they had only waited for the key word, the usual program was confidently rattled off, from the demand for strict gun prohibitions (which criminals are known to be willing to abide by) over the reference to “no shooting rampages in Canada” (so what was La Loche or the Dawson College Shooting?) up to the hot air-intensive outrage over Donald Trump's proposal to arm appropriate personnel at schools in order to be able to react in the event of a case.

The eager political exploitation of tragedies of this kind by the same people, who otherwise like to volubly warn against associating serious crime or sexual assaults by Merkel's ‘guests’ with cultural codes or a policy of open borders, is a satirical reality show.

The fact that the FBI, which preferred instead to deal with conspiracy theories such as ‘Russiagate,’ had for six months ignored clear warnings about the later shooter, doesn’t trouble those who steadfastly demand that weapons should only be in state hands and not in private hands. It troubles them just as little that at the time of the shooting four police officers on duty were in the immediate vicinity of the school and yet are said to have remained inactive.

One of the few prudent statements on the subject came from Susan L. M. Goldberg, who in an article for ‘PJ Media’ dug deeper into the subject and established connections which progressives would like to cover up quickly. She focused on a large number of mass shooters in and outside of schools from Columbine over Adam Lanza, Elliot Rodger, Dylann Roof and Stephen Paddock to Nikolas Cruz and found one thing in common among all the crazed gunmen: fatherlessness or a minimal role that the respective fathers had in their upbringing.

The father-son relationships were not close even in the social settings of the most famous German school killing sprees in Erfurt and Emsdetten, where divorce, death or imprisonment played no part and where the inevitable consequences of the state compulsory school system such as bullying and ostracism were the decisive causes. Similar patterns can be found in connection with ISIS careers. In the case of Nikolas Cruz, who was adopted immediately after birth, the adoptive father died early and three and a half months before the act, the adoptive mother also died.

Dr. Warren Farrell, author of the recently published book „The Boy Crisis,“ provides in it detailed evidence of the fatal consequences that disturbed father-son relationships can have on the psyche of the young: “The rate of mass shootings has tripled since 2011. We blame guns, violence in the media, violence in video games, and poor family values. Each is a plausible player. But our daughters live in the same homes, with the same access to the same guns, video games, and media, and are raised with the same family values. Our daughters are not killing. Our sons are.

“But boys with significant father involvement are not doing these shootings. Without dads as role models, boys’ testosterone is not well channeled. The boy experiences a sense of purposelessness, a lack of boundary enforcement, rudderlessness, and often withdraws into video games and video porn. At worst, when boys’ testosterone is not well-channeled by an involved dad, boys become among the world’s most destructive forces. When boys’ testosterone is well channeled by an involved dad, boys become among the world’s most constructive forces.”

Terry Brennan, co-founder of the association Leading Women for Shared Parenting, points out that 72 percent of all juvenile murderers and 60 percent of all rapists grew up without a father, and 70 percent of those in state institutions such as prisons, psychiatric wards or educational institutions come from households with only one or no parent at all. In this context, the number of broken families is a strong indicator of the development of violent crime in a community, whereas the poverty rate is not.

For a cultural Marxist regime led by childless people and persons for whom sound families represent the declared enemy if only for ideological reasons, connections of this kind are of course highly unwelcome. This is especially true if you are in the middle of a social experiment, in the course of which male immigrants willing to travel alone are imported en masse, whose attitude to conflict resolution by force is much more relaxed than is usual in our regions, where primary school age boys’ urge to move is not infrequently the reason to sedate them by means of psychotropic drugs.

In order to distract the gaze from that heap of rubble created by the ‘sexual revolution,’ feminism, the cultural Marxist subversion of family, tradition and patriotism and the enforcement of lunatic social experiments, the three-minute hate fest against Donald Trump and the US constitutional right to possess weapons, a hate fest which was prescribed from above, is very convenient.

Translated from eigentümlich frei, where the original article was published on 27th February 2018.

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